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Tutorial

Wow! You've found the Tutorial page! As the name implies, you'll find here the most useful tutorials and references I've seen. I also put here the few tutorials that I wrote (one for now).


Contents


Tutorials
Tutorials for things programming.

References
Formats, specs, lists, etc.


Instructional Co-page

Case Study
See if you are as good a programmer as you think you are.



Tutorials

BASIC Techniques and Utilities

Ethan Winer


BASIC Techniques and Utilities was first published as a book and is now distributed in electronic form for free! Contains very useful stuff for the intermediate to the advanced programmer for optimizing their QB programs. Also covers advanced topics such as network programming, advanced file management, and compiler operations. I definitely recommend this handy reference.
Level: Intermediate to Advanced
Rating: Highly recommended

BASIC Techniques and Utilities
536KB (1,513KB)

PC Games Programmers Encyclopedia

The Programmers Encyclopedia contains information for programmers in general. Some of the topics covered include assembly, sound cards, graphics, memory, and input. There are also file formats, specs, tutorials, and lots of other data that you may eventually find useful. The package also contains a reader which lets you view all the information in a topical manner.
Level: Intermediate to Advanced
Rating: Very good

PCGPE
703KB (2,409KB)

QFastman

Jim Phillips

People say that the only way to get speed out of QBASIC is to use Assembly. But that isn't really true. Oftentimes, the best way to increase a program's speed is to use a different programming technique or algorithm. QFastman is a tutorial-by-example that explains how you can speed up your programs by using integers, precalculated values, and other techniques.
Level: Intermediate
Rating: Recommended

QFastman
19KB (42KB)

Aaron Severn's Tutorials

Aaron Severn has written very nice tutorials for the QB programmer. The layout is neat and the information presented is very extensive. The four tutorials are in text format and they can be obtained by following the links below.
Level: Intermediate to Advanced
Rating: Highly recommended

Assembly in QBasic

The Basics of 3D Graphics

BIOS Calls in QuickBasic

Pixel-by-Pixel Scrolling

Password Encryption Technique

SEAV
SEAV Softwares


Here is my tutorial for implementing encryption methods in your game that can't be deciphered even if the most able programmer turns your program inside-out. The key is to use one-way encryption techniques—encryption that for all practical purposes cannot be unraveled.
Level: Beginner to Intermediate
Rating: Good

Password Encryption Technique
9KB (13KB)

Terminator-Z's Graphics Tutorials

These tutorials by Terminator-Z show you how to make eye-catching screen effects using DQB, no less! One deals with morphing, or dynamically rearranging pixels to form different figures. The other deals with crossfading, a technique where two pictures seem to fade from one to the other using elaborate palette techniques.
Level: Intermediate to Advanced
Rating: Very good

Morphing Tutorial
73KB (130KB)

Crossfading Tutorial
75KB (240KB)

386 Assembly Code

Rick

If, like me, you use DEBUG to create your own ASM routines but want to use 386 codes for increased speed, here's a tutorial that shows you how to use extended registers, opcode enhancements, and even protected mode! The tutorial is a QBasic file that contains extensive documentation.
Level: Intermediate to Advanced
Rating: Recommended

386 ASM Code
11KB (32KB)

Dynamic Memory

Charles Johnson

Using DOS routines to allocate and manage your own memory is a real plus in game programming. This tutorial shows you how to access up to 640KB of conventional memory by allocating memory yourself! Prior knowledge of ASM programming is required.
Level: Intermediate to Advanced
Rating: Okay

Dynamic Memory
8KB (19KB)

3D Graphics Programming

Matt Bross

Want to learn how to do 3D programming? Then, download this tutorial and see the concepts explained and the examples presented. You'll find in here a wealth of information you need to program 3D graphics. Warning: the tutorial is one huge text file that is a bit cluttered. If I have the time, I'll probably fix it up (separate the source code, put dividers, etc.).
Level: Intermediate
Rating: Recommended

3D Programming
11KB (34KB)
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References

Intel Op Codes

Intel Corp.


Here's a nice documentation of Intel ASM Op codes up to the 486 chip. This is a complete reference to all those SETC, REP MOVSD, ADA, JNZ, etc. op codes you want in your assembly programming. (I found it especially useful since I use DEBUG and this reference states which op codes I can use!)
Level: Advanced
Rating: Highly recommended

Intel Op Codes
20KB (112KB)

LIM Expanded Memory Specs 4.0

Dick Flanagan

This is a complete transcription of the original Lotus, Intel, Microsoft (LIM) Expanded Memory Specifications 4.0. If you know how to access interrupts in QB, then you should be able to make your own EMS routines in a snap using this handy reference (that's how I made mine).
Level: Intermediate
Rating: Recommended

EMS Specs
65KB (439KB)

PC Hardware Ports List

Win Osterholt

A nice look at the DOS hardware ports you can access in QB. Unfortunately, the info here was last updated in 1994, so Win95/98 ports aren't included.
Level: Intermediate
Rating: Very good

Ports List
19KB (78KB)
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